Digital accessibility workshops coming up

Digital accessibility is about making your documents and website accessible to the widest range of users. That might include people who are blind, have low vision, are colourblind, have a learning or intellectual disability, or one of the 45% of Australians who have low literacy.

Vision Australia are offerring a range of courses to up your digital accessibility skills.

Including: Inclusive Design, Creating Accessible Documents: Word and PDF, Web Accessibility Techniques and Testing and more!

Check out their website for sessions in your city: https://www.visionaustralia.org/services/digital-access/training

Reading radio scripts out loud with a screen reader

In my work with the CMTO I’ve been developing techniques to best assist learners in community radio who are using screen readers – ie.¬† people who are blind or have a vision impairment. Screen readers convert written text into voice, so that a user who is blind can ‘read’ the text, from top to bottom (as long as that text is formatted to be accessible, more about that here). Using a screen reader to read back a pre-written script in real time can be a challenge for some screen reader users, but worth the effort to become confident on-air.

Continue reading “Reading radio scripts out loud with a screen reader”

From the makers of the DAT now comes the WAT for accessible web dev

Those canny developers at Vision Australia last year made my life easier with their Document Accessibility Toolbar for MS Word that you can find here: https://www.visionaustralia.org/services/digital-access/document-accessibility-toolbar/

Now web developers  can try out their Web Accessibility Toolbar for Internet Explorer here: https://www.visionaustralia.org/services/digital-access/resources/web-accessibility-toolbar-ie

Need accessible documents? Check out MSWord templates

In recent weeks I’ve been exploring the wonderful (and hitherto mostly unknown to me) world of accessible word documents. In MS Word, using document styles, headings and alternative descriptions (alt-tags) on images makes your document more readable for those using screenreaders, as well as more consistently formatted for everyone else. In addition, formatting for accessibility in word before creating text in websites makes the job of accessible website design simpler.¬† Accessibility checkers added to Word help you double-check it’s all ok. Continue reading “Need accessible documents? Check out MSWord templates”